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 Final Exam: Wednesday

Review Vocabulary has been handed out in class

































Roaring 20’s  Test Tomorrow 


I can explain how the Republican Presidents of the 1920’s tried to help America after the war.

I can recall the different facts of the Presidents of the 1920’s

I can explain the phrase “Return to Normalcy.”

I can connect how the Presidents of the 1920’s tried to use Laissez Faire to improve the economy after the war.


Republican Presidents of the 1920’s

Warren G Harding

Calvin Coolidge



Teapot Dome Scandal

Ohio Gang

“Return to Normalcy”

Laissez Faire


I can explain how Americans benefited from new financial benefits

I can describe advancements in aviation during the 1920s which lead to heroes and heroines 

I can describe the changes some women went through in the 1920’s

I can describe the changes that some youths went through in the 1920’s


Society and Economics 

Installment Buying & Advertisement 

Charles Lindbergh & Amelia Earhart

Barnstorms

Woman's Suffrage & 19th Amendment

Flappers


I can describe the Temperance movement

I can explain the positives and negatives of prohibition 

I can explain the reasons for and against Prohibition in the 1920s.

I can explain why Prohibition failed in the 1920s.

I can explain the cause and effect of organized crime on the 192


Prohibition & 18th Amendment

Organized Crime & Al Capone


Rum Runners & Bootleggers

Speakeasies & Cotton Club


I can discuss the impact the Harlem Renaissance had on the 1920s culture

I can describe the reasons for the mass migration of African Americans to northern cities

I can describe the impact the Great Migration had American society


Harlem Renaissance

Great Migration

Racism & Segregation (Jim Crow)

Jazz Age

Langston Huges

Negro Baseball League


I can define the different negative movements against Americans

I can describe the different groups who pushed their “radical” agenda onto the rest of the US


Ku Klux Klan

Nativists 

Fundamentalist

John Scopes Trail

Charles Darwin


Evolution

Creationism

xenophobia

Sacco and Vanzetti 

 



Heroes and Villains final stretch

These are the last few assignments and due dates for this research project.

Friday 3/7 Half Draft Heroes and Villains paper due (Homework grade)

Monday 3/10 H&V vocabulary. 7 terms specific to the character (Homework grade)

Wednesday 3/12 Title for the paper (catchy and accurate ) (Homework grade)

Tuesday 3/18 Final Draft Heroes and Villains paper due (test Grade)


I am trying to work out two more after school extra help sessions this week. 

These will be by sign up only! I will know the extra help days by tomorrow. 


Please help by following up at home with your child about completing these assignments


Any help would be greatly appreciated. We are almost done!

Matt Pool


Also, the parent portal is up to date to this point. 


Copy of the 3/3/2014 Heroes and Villains email

Hello

At this point the 8th grade is coming to the end of the Heroes and Villains research project. 

However, with the final due date looming, there are a number of students who have not completed some vital components. 


Please follow up with your child about the following assignments:

Thesis Statement (or rewrite)

Document Tracker

A book on their topic

Completion of their Guided Notes (8 pages)

Essay Outline


(also roaring 20’s vocabulary which can be found on my homework page)


There is “half a draft” of their papers due this Friday.

The final draft of the paper is due March 18th.


Please help by following up at home with your child about completing these assignments. In total there will be 10 total assignment associated with this project. 


Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

Matt Pool

Copy of the 2/21/2014 Heroes and Villains email

Hello,

This is a follow up email regarding the Heroes and Villains Project. 


Assignments and Due Dates

2/24 Work Cited Page Due (Document Tracker) 

Four Sources (Wikipedia, magazine/newspaper article, book, website)

2/25 Book sources (hard copy or digital copy) brought to class

2/28 Guided Notes (eight pages)

3/3 Outline Check

3/5 Printed copy of a magazine/newspaper article (hard copy) brought to class

3/7 Guided Notes Due (8 complete pages)

3/14 Half Draft Heroes and Villains paper due

3/18 Final Draft Heroes and Villains paper due


Lunch Time Help

Every Tuesday -Friday


After School Help:

2/20 Wednesday

2/26 Wednesday 

2/27 Thursday

3/5 Wednesday

3/6 Thursday

More dates to be announced


Class Time to work on H&V

2/19 Wednesday

2/20 Thursday

2/21 Friday

2/28 Friday

3/3 Monday

3/14 Friday

3/18 Monday




Heroes and Villains 

Please scroll down for due dates, assignments and extra help 

Roaring 20’s  Quiz Review : Quiz 2/27 Thursday

 

I can explain how the Republican Presidents of the 1920’s tried to help America after the war.

I can recall the different facts of the Presidents of the 1920’s

I can explain the phrase “Return to Normalcy.”

I can connect how the Presidents of the 1920’s tried to use Laissez Faire to improve the economy after the war.

Republican Presidents of the 1920’s

Warren G Harding

Calvin Coolidge

Teapot Dome Scandal

Ohio Gang

“Return to Normalcy”

Laissez Faire

 

I can explain how Americans benefited from new financial benefits

I can describe advancements in aviation during the 1920s which lead to heroes and heroines 

I can describe the changes some women went through in the 1920’s

I can describe the changes that some youths went through in the 1920’s

Society and Economics 

Installment Buying & Advertisement 

Charles Lindbergh & Amelia Earhart

Barnstorms

Woman's Suffrage & 19th Amendment

Flappers

 

I can describe the Temperance movement

I can explain the positives and negatives of prohibition 

I can explain the reasons for and against Prohibition in the 1920s.

I can explain why Prohibition failed in the 1920s.

I can explain the cause and effect of organized crime on the 192

Prohibition & 18th Amendment

Organized Crime & Al Capone

Rum Runners & Bootleggers

Speakeasies

 

I can discuss the impact the Harlem Renaissance had on the 1920s culture

I can describe the reasons for the mass migration of African Americans to northern cities

I can describe the impact the Great Migration had American society

Harlem Renaissance

Great Migration

Racism & Segregation (Jim Crow)

Jazz Age

 





1920’s Vocabulary

  1. 1.        Al Capone

  1. 2.        Calvin Coolidge

  1. 3.        Flapper

  1. 4.        Fundamentalism

  1. 5.        Harlem Renaissance

  1. 6.        John Scopes

  1. 7.        Ku Klux Klan

  1. 8.        Marcus Garvey

  1. 9.        Palmer Raids

  1. 10.      Prohibition

  1. 11.      Red Scare

           13.      Teapot Dome Scandal

  1. 14.      Warren G. Harding

          15.      Women’s Suffrage

  1. 16.      laissez faire

  1. 17.      installment buying

  1. 18.      popular culture

  1. 19.      lost generation

  1. 20.   expatriates






Heroes and Villains 

Assignments and Due Dates
(the following three assignments are due NEXT WEEK)
2/24 Work Cited Page Due (Document Tracker) (Quiz Grade)
        Four Sources (Wikipedia, magazine/newspaper article, book, website)
2/25 Book sources (hard copy or digital copy) brought to class (Homework Grade)
2/28 Guided Notes (eight pages) (Quiz Grade)
3/3 Outline Check (Homework Grade)
3/5 Printed copy of a magazine/newspaper article (hard copy) brought to class (Homework/Quiz Grade)
3/7 Half Draft Heroes and Villains paper due (Homework Grade)
3/12 Submission of a Title for the Heroes and Villains paper (Homework Grade)
3/18 Final Draft Heroes and Villains paper due (Test Grade)

Lunch Time Help
        Every Tuesday -Friday

After School Help:
        2/20 Wednesday
        2/26 Wednesday
        2/27 Thursday
        3/5 Wednesday
        3/6 Thursday
        More dates to be announced

Class Time to work on H&V
2/19 Wednesday
2/20 Thursday
2/21 Friday
2/28 Friday
3/3 Monday
3/14 Friday
3/18 Monday

8th grade social studies will have a Midterm Exam Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of next week (1/27-29)

This information has also been emailed home. 


The Midterm Review Information

Part I: Essay- 5 paragraphs 3 documents 

Part II: Multiple Choice 


Westward Expansion 

barbed wire fences, sod houses, sodbusters, Great Plains, mail order catalogs, manifest destiny, Native Americans, transcontinental railroad, reservations, Daws Act, Cattle Drives, Homestead Act, Battle of Little Bighorn, Wounded Knee Massacre, 


Why did the government want Americans to settle the west?

Why did American settlers move west and what factors (push/pull) drew settlers west?

How did settlers adapt to the environment of the west and what difficulties did settlers face?

How did the US government encourage the Railroad companies to build the railroad?

What difficulties did the two railroad companies have in constructing the railroad?

What positive or negative effects did the Transcontinental Railroad have on America?

How did westward expansion impact the Native Americans?

Explain the different conflicts between the United States and the Native Americans?

How did the United States attempt to help the Native Americans?



Industrial Society

Industrial Revolution, tenement buildings, Corporations, labor unions, assembly lines, mass-production, monopolies, Industrial Revolution, Urbanization, Standard Oil, US Steel, interchangeable parts  , consumerism, urbanization, Alexander Graham Bell, Henry Ford, John D Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, big business, natural resources


Explain the different factor which led to the United States to become industrialized. 

How monopolies take use their competitive advantages to eliminate their competition?

I can explain the similarities and differences between Horizontal Integration and Vertical Integration

How did were monopolies a positive for American consumers?

I understand the positive and negative impacts that Industrialization had on workers

Use an example to explain how Henry Ford revolutionized the industrialization of the automobile industry.

I understand the importance and impact inventions had of the Industrial Revolution and on society. 

Explain the difference between “Captain of Industry” and “Robber Baron?”

What technology allowed for cities to become more urbanized?

Progressives Era

Progressive movement, Sherman Antitrust Act , muckrakers,Meat Inspection Act,  Pure Food and drug Act, primary elections, Triangle Shirtwaist fire, , segregation, T. Roosevelt, Hull House, The Jungle, Upton Sinclair, child labor, Boss Tweed, tenements, Eugene V. Debs , Jacob Riis, breaker boys, 19th Amendment,

Explain child labor  and other examples of poor working conditions during the early 1900s.

 Explain the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire and the impact it had on influencing labor laws.
Describe the events of Seneca Falls changing role of women.

Explain the influence certain individuals had during the Progressive Era. (Examples:Muckrakers, Captains of Industry, Progressives, Activists, Trustbusters, Suffragists, Robber Barons, Conservationist)

Determine the influence of printed works during the Progressive Era. (Examples: How the Other Half Lives, The Jungle, History of the Standard Oil Company, etc.)

I can articulate the horrors of the meat packing industry prior to government intervention.

I can evaluate social and political issues of the Progressive Era.

Describe the actions of muckrakers during the Progressive Era.

Explain the connection between poor working conditions in the creation of labor unions.

Imperialism

Open Door policy, William Randolph Hearst, Spanish-American War,  yellow journalism,  foreign policy, isolationism, Big Stick Policy, Alaska, Hawaiian Islands, Panama Canal, Latin America, Monroe Doctrine, USS Maine, Rough Riders, intervene, Roosevelt Corollary, Colombia, Imperialism, Boxer Rebellion, William Randolph Hearst, Joseph Pulitzer, China, Spheres of Influence  

Explain how an increase need for foreign trade drove the United States to gain new strategic territories and control foreign markets.

Explain how policies like the Open Door Policy and the Platt Amendment secured American interests.

How did Chinese nationalist react to foreign invaders?

Cite examples from the definition of imperialism of the United States influenced different territories. 

How did yellow journalism influence Americans to side with the Cuban people?

What were the long term and the immediate causes of the Spanish-American War?

What is the connection between our need for a Panama Canal and the Spanish-American War?

How important is the Panama Canal to our country? Explain?

What is the Monroe Doctrine? How did the Roosevelt Corollary change it?





Imperilism Test Wednesday 1/22

Imperialism Study Sheet

I can define the following terms

Imperialism

Foreign Policy

Isolation 

Seward’s Folly (etc)

Annexation

Hawaii

Natural Resources

Markets

Spheres of Influences

Open Door Policy

Boxer Rebellion

USS Maine

Battle of Manila Bay

Yellow Journalism

Rough Riders

Platt Amendment

Atrocities

Intervene 

Monroe Doctrine

Roosevelt Corollary

Panama Canal

Lock System

I can identify the parts of Imperialism

Political Hawaii Panama Canal

Social Alaska Roosevelt Corollary 

Economic Spanish-American War

Military China

I can identify the importance of the following individuals/groups

Queen Liliuokalani

Stanford B Dole

William Seward

Uncle Sam

John Hay

Teddy Roosevelt

William McKinley 

Admiral George Dewy

Joseph Pulitzer

William R Hearst

James Monroe

I can identify the countries/areas that the United States was involved with during Imperialism

Alaska

Hawaii

China

Cuba

Guam

Puerto Rico

Philippians

Panama 

Colombia

Asia

Europe

I can identify the following locations

Western Hemisphere Central America

Eastern Hemisphere Latin America

North America The Caribbean 

South America Europe

Asia







Oral Report and Mini Poster Project

Handed out on 11/22

Due Date: TBA

Task:

Create an oral report that summarizes the accomplishments and impact one “Progressive” had on American society

Create a mini poster report that summarizes the accomplishments and impact one “Progressive” had on American society

 

 Mini Research Report                          

Oral Presentation Requirements

Students will hand in their presentation notes and presentation materials

 

            Your Notes:

            Use the guiding questions to help you find and organize your information.

            The guiding questions should also be used to organize your oral presentation

 

            You will take notes using the Information folders provided in class. These folders cannot leave class       and cannot go home.

 

            You are to research additional information on your own ( There will be after school opportunities)

 

            Presentation information

 

  • Name your Progressive (Muckraker or Activist.)
  • Clearly uses the correct vocabulary in your work
  • These are the  guiding questions
  1. 1.       The specific area they tried to make a difference (what they are known for)
  2. 2.       Explain the problem they tackled and the negative impact this problem would have on society
  3. 3.       How did they become involved in their area of interest?
  4. 4.       Explain how they tried to make a difference
  5. 5.       Were they influenced by someone to complete their work or did they influence others to continue their work? (specific examples)
  6. 6.       Explain whether or not their contribution to society can still be seen today.      
  7. 7.       List 3 interesting facts about your character. (your choice)
  8. 8.       Quotes

 

 

The Oral Presentation

  • Ø      Spoke clearly and with eye contact
  • Ø      Must have their  presentation on index cards
  • Ø      Does not simply read from index cards, speaks about topic with an understanding
  • Ø      Must be able to answer questions about their topic.
  • Ø      See Rubric on grading requirements (will be provided at a future date)

 

Poster (Copy Paper Size)

On your poster the following information about your person must be stated:

  • Ø      Clearly states the correct vocabulary
  • Ø      Name your Progressive (Muckraker/Activist).
  • Ø      State what they are known for.
  • Ø      How did they become involved in their area of interest?
    • o       Each must be elaborated with two statements
    • Ø      Explain whether or not their contribution to society can still be seen today.
      • o       Each must be elaborated with two statements

 

Your poster also needs to display the following

  • Ø      Title
  • Ø      An illustrations of something that deals with your Progressive (Muckraker/Activities) and their area of involvement 
  • Ø      Color & Creativity
  • Ø      Neat and Organized
  • Ø      Fills the space of the paper
  • Ø      See Rubric(will be provided at a future date)
  • Ø       

This will be used as a visual during your project

 

(Rushed work or missing ANY of the above categories will not be accepted)

Write you Progressive Era person’s name

 

HERE:_______________________________________________________________________

The Progressives

 


1.            Betty Freidan

2.            Booker T Washington

3.            Burton J Hendrick

4.            Carrie Chapman Catt

5.            Charlotte Perkins Gilman

6.            Eugene Debs

7.            Florence Kelly

8.            Frank Norris

9.            Gustavus Myers

10.          Henry Demarest Lloyd

11.          Ida B Wells

12.          Ida Tarbell

13.          Jacob Riis

14.          Jane Addams

15.          Jessica Mitford

16.          John Muir

17.          John Spargo

18.           Lewis Hine

19.          Lillian Wald

20.          Lincoln Steffens

21.          Mother Jones

22.          Nellie Bly

23.          Rachel Carson

24.          Ralph Naders

25.          Robert M La Follet

26.          Stannard Baker

27.          Susan B Anthony

28.          Teddy Roosevelt Conservation

29.          Teddy Roosevelt   Industry

30.          Theodore Dreiser

31.          Thomas Nast

32.          Upton Sinclar

33.          WEB Dubois

34.     William Howard Taft


 





Progressive Era Quiz Study Guide Friday 11/22

I can define;

Progressive Era

Muckrakers

Union

Initiative

Referendum

Recall

Reform

Trustbuster

Sherman Anti Trust Act

Square Deal

Monopolies/Trusts


I can describe the individuals that worked for social change

Upton Sinclair

Theodore Roosevelt

Jacob Riis

Ida Tarbell

Lincoln Steffens

Lewis Hine

John Muir

Samuel Gompers


I can describe the areas of change reformers looked to improve

Social

Political

Economic

Labor

Monopolies/Trusts


I can explain how certain events, laws, photographs or works of writing impacted America history

Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

The Jungle

Pure Food and Drug Act

Meat Inspection Act

National Parks

The History of the Standard Oils Company 

The Shame of Cities

How the other Half Lives

 

 

Due Thursday 11/14 

After reading Why the Triangle Fire Matters Still, and previous Progressive Era readings, 

write a response that defines why the tragedy of the fire was allowed to occur and explains

 its significancy in changing American labor history.

Your response should have;

 two pieces of text evidence per paragraph

use all three articles in your response

 

Third Article 

Why the Triangle Fire Matters Still Lexile 1120

By David Von Drehle

Published March 16, 2011, issue of March 25, 2011.


The spirit of the early 20th century was, simply put, the spirit of Progress. New Yorkers who, as children, read by the light of whale oil lamps and crossed the East River by wooden ferryboat now crossed over bridges aglow with electric lights, as if riveted with diamonds. A generation earlier, the tallest structure in the city was a church steeple; now new skyscrapers were topping out at the rate of one every five days. Humans could fly and pictures could move.

Among the countless lasting inventions was the modern newspaper, dreamed up by publishers with names like William Randolph Hearst and Adolph Ochs and — the most influential of them all — Joseph Pulitzer. The New York World, Pulitzer’s great newspaper, expanded from the news-and-opinion format of the 19th century to introduce feature sections, a magazine, comic strips, and lots of photographs. Pulitzer was the first publisher to sell a bulky Sunday paper, which in turn led him to elevate college football from Ivy League brawling into an enduring cultural sensation. He needed something popular to lead the Sunday news pages.

But the World didn’t need to create a story for Sunday, March 26, 1911. On Saturday afternoon, the 25th, the World’s star reporter and future editor, Herbert Bayard Swope, charged into a hotel suite where New York District Attorney Charles Whitman was holding an informal press conference. “That will be enough, boys!” Swope declared. “The Triangle building’s on fire and I think the D.A. should be there.”

News of the deadly blaze at the Triangle Waist Company dominated every front page in the city the next morning. The story was so gruesome it required no sensationalism. At closing time in the city’s largest blouse factory, a spark or cigarette butt set fire to a bin of fabric scraps and tissue paper. Within minutes, the flames had trapped nearly 150 workers, mostly women and girls, on the ninth floor of a 10-story building just east of Washington Square. A huge crowd of witnesses rushed from the square and nearby streets, arriving in time to watch helplessly as victims leapt from the windows to escape the flames.

By the time Swope and the D.A. reached the street corner, 146 people were dead.

In the days that followed, the major papers continued to run huge headlines over stories examining the fire — what caused it, and who was to blame. The World demanded a vigorous set of new safety laws. Hearst’s New York American pointed an accusatory finger at the city building commissioner. Other newspapers called for the prosecution of the Triangle factory owners, Max Blanck and Isaac Harris. “BLAME SHIFTED ON ALL SIDES FOR FIRE HORROR,” the Times headlined.

But the passion for change burned out almost as quickly as the fire itself. Readers in New York had their pick of some two dozen daily newspapers; thus, the competition to find a new story trumped all other concerns. Within a few weeks after the catastrophe, a headline deep inside the World declared: “Public Officials Already Losing Interest in Proposed Reforms.”

Why, then, did the Triangle fire lead, ultimately, to the most sweeping workplace safety reforms America had ever seen? A significant part of the answer lies in the journalism translated in today’s commemorative issue of the Forward.

Abraham Cahan was a Jewish immigrant from Lithuania whose creativity and influence were, in their way, a match for Pulitzer’s or Hearst’s, although his fame and fortune never approached theirs. In 1897, Cahan founded the Yiddish-language Forverts to serve the rapidly growing community of Eastern European Jews on the Lower East Side. Patriotic, pro-union, and passionately socialist, the Forverts (or Forward in English) became, in many ways, the soul of that community. Roughly a third of the immigrant Jews in New York worked in the garment shops in those days, and the Forverts rallied them to organize — even as it tutored them on their transition into American society. “It is as important to teach the reader to carry a handkerchief in his pocket as it is to teach him to carry a union card,” Cahan once explained.

With remarkable speed, the new immigrants built a self-sufficient society around pillars like the Forverts, the Workmen’s Circle, the United Hebrew Trades and the Educational Alliance. Through the twin engines of organization and assimilation — the guiding principles of Cahan’s newspaper — they became a significant political force in New York City.

Their rise did not escape the attention of New York’s corrupt Democratic political machine, Tammany Hall. Tammany’s power was its loyal base among the Irish and German immigrants of the previous generation. But by the early 1900s, many of those earlier arrivals were moving out of the crowded Manhattan tenements — and the new immigrants were taking their places. The Lower East Side became “a wonderful field for the Socialistic propaganda,” the New York Times explained at the time, “and socialism has a great army of devotees here.” In 1905 and 1909, they threw their support to publisher Hearst in his campaigns to wrest control of the city from Tammany Hall.

This solidarity, with the Forverts as a catalyst, was a force that Tammany Boss Charles F. Murphy could not ignore. And when hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers lined the streets in a driving rainstorm to honor a funeral procession for the Triangle victims — one of the largest crowds ever gathered in the city — Tammany Hall realized that the needs of the workers could speak to America as a whole.

For the first time in its long history, Tammany Hall embraced genuine reform. Murphy ordered the Tammany-controlled state legislature to create a powerful Factory Investigating Commission, led by two young Tammany lawmakers, Robert F. Wagner and Alfred E. Smith. The commission pushed through the most sweeping agenda of pro-labor and pro-safety laws in the country, and this made Tammany more popular and more powerful than ever before. Tammany’s Al Smith rode the reform wave to the New York governor’s mansion, where he served four highly effective terms. He never forgot the Triangle’s dead.

Robert Wagner, meanwhile, entered the U.S. Senate, where memories of the Triangle fire burned bright in his mind as he wrote much of the legislation known as the New Deal.

By translating the Forverts coverage of the Triangle fire into English, the staff of today’s Forward has shone a new light on the role of a brilliant community newspaper in reshaping the politics of a nation. The Forverts never lost its passion for the people it served. It called them to stand up, join together and take their rightful place in their new American home. A century after the tragedy at the Triangle Waist Company, in these important translations, we once again hear that call.






 

 

 

 

 

 

Test Thursday 10/31

Review Material

I can define the following:

Industrial Revolution

Assembly Lines

Standardized Parts

Mass production

Monopolies

Standard Oil Company

US Steel

Horizontal Integration

Vertical Integration

Tenements

Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

Philanthropy

Textile Industry

Urbanization

Immigration

Raw Materials

Finished Products

Westward Expansion

Reservation

Homestead Act

Homesteaders

Transcontinental RR

Great Plains

Land Grants (TCRR)

Buffalo

Battle of Little Bighorn

Wounded Knee Massacre

I can identify examples of:

Assembly Lines

Mass Production

Monopolies

Horizontal Integration

Vertical Integration

Tenements

Child Labor

Poor Working

Conditions

New Inventions

Homesteads

Reservations

Great Plains

TCRR construction

difficulties


 


I understand the importance of the following individuals:


                Skilled and Unskilled Workers

            Immigration

               Andrew Carnegie

              John D Rockefeller

                Henry Ford

              Alexander Graham Bell

               Thomas Edison

                Boss Tweed


 

I understand the positive and negative impacts that:


Industrialization had on

                  Workers

                Children

                Consumers

               Textile Industry

               Coal Industry

                 New Inventions

                  Immigration

                    Urbanization

Transcontinental RR

               Homesteaders

                Native Americans

                Trade

Westward Expansion had on:

                Homesteaders

                Native Americans

                   Trade

I understand the connection between Urbanization and Industrialization:

                 Tenements

                Transportation

                Immigration

                Infrastructure

                Transcontinental RR

               New Technology

Native Americans

  1. 1.        How did the plains tribes adapt to their environment?
  2. 2.        Explain how important the Buffalo were to the plains Native Americans
  3. 3.        How did westward expansion impact the Native Americans?

Homesteads

  1. 1.        Why did the government want Americans to settle the west?

Transcontinental Railroad

  1. 1.        How did the US government encourage the Railroad companies to build the railroad?
  2. 2.        What difficulties did the two railroad companies have in constructing the railroad?
  3. 3.        What positive or negative effects did the Transcontinental Railroad have on America?





Quiz Friday 10/25

I can define the following:

Industrial Revolution 

Automotive Industry

Assembly Lines

Standardized Parts

Mass production

Monopolies 

Standard Oil Company

US Steel

Horizontal Integration

Vertical Integration 

Philanthropist

Urbanization

Raw Materials

Finished Products



I can identify examples of:

Assembly Lines

Mass Production 

Laissez-Faire 

Free enterprise

Monopolies

Horizontal Integration

Vertical Integration 

 “Big Business”

Raw Materials

Finished Products


I understand the importance of the following individuals:

Skilled and Unskilled Workers

Andrew Carnegie

John D Rockefeller

Henry Ford

Alexander Graham Bell

Thomas Edison

JP Morgan

Cornelius Vanderbilt



I understand the positive and negative impacts that Industrialization had on:

Workers

Children

Consumers

Coal Industry

Immigrants 

Urbanization


I understand the connection between Urbanization and Industrialization:

Transportation

Infrastructure


I can explain the similarities and differences between the following:

Horizontal Integration

Vertical Integration 

Monopolies 

Standard Oil Company

US Steel

I understand the importance and impact of the following inventions had of the Industrial Revolution:

Assembly Line

Singer Sewing Machine

Telegraph/ Morse code

Trans-Atlantic Cable

Telephone

Light Bulb

Assembly Line

the Sholes typewriter



Due Tuesday 10/22. Finish work from Class: 

1) Annotation

2) Graphic Organizer

3) Paragraph Response 

 

Question: How were workers impacted negatively during the Second Industrial Revolution?

Read and annotate the passage

Answer the following question with a strong paragraph response. Use the Writing Frame to organize your work.

Working Conditions in the Industrial Revolution

Working today is usually quite safe. The government has made laws saying that employers have to look after the workforce and provide safety equipment and other things for them. At the start of the Industrial Revolution none of these laws existed and so working in a factory could prove to be very dangerous indeed. This section looks at some of the conditions faced by workers and offers a brief explanation of what was done to improve these conditions.

Industries such as the cotton trade were particularly hard for workers to endure long hours of labour. The nature of the work being done meant that the workplace had to be very hot, steam engines contributing further to the heat in this and other industries. Machinery was not always fenced off and workers would be exposed to the moving parts of the machines whilst they worked. Children were often employed to move between these dangerous machines as they were small enough to fit between tightly packed machinery. This led to them being placed in a great deal of danger and mortality (death rates) were quite high in factories. Added to the dangers of the workplace also consider the impact of the hours worked. It was quite common for workers to work 12 hours or more a day, in the hot and physically exhausting work places. Exhaustion naturally leads to the worker becoming sluggish (slow), which again makes the workplace more dangerous.





Homework Notes Due Tuesday 10/8

Chapter 6/ pages 183-184

Complete two of the 7 componets of the factors that encouraged industrial growth

The Seven Factors

1. Plentiful Natural Resources

2. Growing Population

3. Inproved Transportation

4. High Immigration 

5. New Inventions

6. Investment Capital

7. Governemnt Assistance


Example of completed notes

1. Plentiful Natural Resources

Examples of natural resopurces: Gold, silver, iron ore, copper, timber, water

Text Evidence from the Book:

"Industry used these resources to manufacture a variety of goods."



 Vocab Due Monday oct 7

Industrialization

  1. 1.       Alexander Graham Bell
  2. 2.       Andrew Carnegie
  3. 3.       Assembly Line
  4. 4.       Corporation
  5. 5.       Free Enterprise
  6. 6.       Haymarket Affair
  7. 7.       Immigration
  8. 8.       Industrialization
  9. 9.       John D. Rockefeller
  10. 10.   Laissez Faire
  11. 11.   Mass Production
  12. 12.   Monopolies
  13. 13.   Natural Resources 
  14. 14.   Philanthropists
  15. 15.   Pullman Strike
  16. 16.   Standard Oil
  17. 17.   Sweatshops
  18. 18.   Thomas Edison
  19. 19.    Triangle Shirt Waste Fire
  20. 20.   Trusts
  21. 21.   Urbanization
  22. 22.   Xenophobia

 

Westward Expansion Test Friday 10/4

 

Westward Expansion Study Guide

Homesteads

  1. Why did the government want Americans to settle the west?

  2. Why did American settlers move west?

  3. What factors (push/pull) drew settlers west?

  4. How did settlers adapt to the environment of the west?

  5. What difficulties did settlers face?

  • Great Plains

  • Sodbuster

  • steel plows

  • Windmills

  • Mail Order Catalog

  • Homestead Act


Transcontinental Railroad

  1. How did the US government encourage the the Railroad companies to build the railroad?

  2. What difficulties did the two railroad companies have in constructing the railroad?

  3. What positive or negative effects did the Transcontinental Railroad have on America?

  • Buffalo Bill Cody

  • Immigrant workers

  • Promontory Point

  • Transcontinental Railroad

  • Union Pacific

  • Central Pacific


Native Americans

  1. How did the plains tribes adapt to their environment?

  2. Explain how important the Buffalo were to the plains Native Americans

  3. How did westward expansion impact the Native Americans?

  4. Explain the different conflicts between the the United States and the Native Americans?

  5. How did the United States attempt to help the Native Americans?

  • Battle of Little Bighorn

  • Reservations

  • Sand Creek Massacre

  • Wounded Knee Massacre

  • Chief Joseph

  • Nez Perce

  • George Custer

  • Geronimo

  • Dawes Act

  • A Century of Dishonor

  • Sitting Bull


Cowboys and Cattle Drives

14) Why were young boys the best cowboys?

15) where did most cowboys learn their skill from?

16) How did the railroad impact the cattle industry?

Chaps, & sombreros

Longhorn cattle

Railheads

Cattle Drives

 

Homesteader Letter Due 10/3

Quiz tomorrow Friday 9/26

            Homestead

            Homestead Act

            Sod Busters

           How does it impact our country?

Native Americans

         Culture

         Buffalo

         Reservations

         Conflicts

Transcontinental Railroad

       Grants

       Construction workforce

       How does this impact our country?

Tomorrows quiz will have an article to read and annotate with an assessment question based on the article.

 

 

 

 

 

9/9 Westward Expansion Vocabulary Due 9/16

Westward Expansion Vocabulary 

 Use the Glossary 

Battle of Little Bighorn

Boomtown

Dawes Act

Homestead Act

Mailorder catalogs

Reservations

Sod Busters

Transcontinental Railroad 

Wounded Knee Massacre

use the Dictionary 

Teepee 

economy

 

9/9

Fifty States Study Review Game

http://www.learninggamesforkids.com/us_state_games/map-the-50-states.html

 

 

9/05

Study the Fifty States (QUIZ TBA)

 

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas
California Colorado Connecticut Delaware
Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho
Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas
Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland
Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi
Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada
New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York
North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma
Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina
South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah
Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia
Wisconsin Wyoming

Dover Middle School   2368 Route 22   Dover Plains, NY 12522   Phone: (845) 877-5740   Fax: (845) 877-5749

The Dover Union Free School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities.  
The following people have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies:

Donna Basting, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, Staff Development, and Technology
2368 Route 22, Dover Plains, NY  12522
845-877-5700 x1233 

Genie Angelis, High School Principal
2368 Route 22, Dover Plains, NY  12522
845-877-5700 x1143

For further information on notice of non-discrimination, visit http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OCR/contactus.cfm for the address and phone number of the office that serves your area, or call 1-800-421-3481.

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